Representing yourself

You can choose to represent yourself in the Planning and Environment (P and E Court).

Alternatively, you can have a lawyer or even an agent who is not a lawyer represent you. For example, when residents group together to start an appeal or elect to become party to an appeal, they will often appoint one resident, who is not a lawyer, to represent the group as their agent.

Although you’re not required to have a lawyer, you should consult a lawyer about whether you have valid grounds to appeal, the steps you need to take and the time limits for taking them.

If you choose to bring the case to court and act for yourself, you must do your own investigating, researching and preparing, and must be available to attend court when required. This can be time consuming.

If you do intend to represent yourself or be represented by an agent who is not a lawyer, see the Environmental Defenders Office’s guide, The community litigants handbook (fourth edition).

This handbook helps self-represented litigants understand the rules and procedures of the P and E Court.

Please note:

As a result of the repeal of the Sustainable Planning Act 2009 and the introduction of the Planning Act 2016 on 3 July 2017, this handbook references repealed legislation. However, the document is still useful in understanding court procedures and practices.

Find more information about representing yourself in Queensland Courts.